The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Zapata


Cuernavaca Tourism Office. The figure in the balcony is Emiliano Zapata (August 8, 1879–April 10, 1919) was a leading figure in the Mexican Revolution, which broke out in 1910, and which was initially directed against the president Porfirio Díaz. He formed and commanded an important revolutionary force, the Liberation Army of the South.

At that time, Mexico was ruled by a dictatorship under Porfirio Díaz, who had seized power in 1876. The social system of the time was a sort of proto-capitalist feudal system, with large landed estates (haciendas) controlling more and more of the land and squeezing out the independent communities of the indigenous and mestizos, who were then subsequently forced into debt slavery (peonaje) on the haciendas. Díaz ran local elections to pacify the people and run a government that they could argue was self-imposed. Under Díaz, close confidantes and associates were given offices in districts throughout Mexico. These offices became the enforcers of "land reforms" that actually concentrated the haciendas into fewer hands. [Any similarity with actuality?]

Quotes:
¡Tierra y Libertad! (Translation: Land and Liberty)
"Ignorancia y obscurantismo nunca han producido otra cosa que rebaños de esclavos para la tirania" (Translation: Ignorance and obscurantism have never produced anything other than flocks of slaves for tyranny). (In a letter to Pancho Villa)
"Es mejor morir de pie que vivir un siglo de rodillas." (Translation: It is better to die standing than to live a century on your knees.)
"La tierra es de quien la trabaja." (Translation: The land belongs to those who work it). [ Wiki ]

Gracias por su visita / Thanks for visiting.

6 comments :

Baruch said...

Your pictures are varied and interesting - showing various aspects of Mexico City. Well done!

Abraham Lincoln said...

I have heard of this man and think I saw a movie about him not that long ago. I like your photography of him in the doorway. Sort of like they got him in jail.

GLORIA said...

ADORO LAS FOTOS DE PUERTAS Y VENTANAS!
ME PARECE PRESIOSA LA IMAGEN PERO MÁS EL TEXTO SOBRE NUESTRO MÉXICO.
SALUDOS

Kate said...

The vivid colour of the wall frames the doorway beautifully. Thanks for the history lesson; I hope lots of people already know this part of Mexcan history!

Tony Y Natalia said...

ME GUSTA EL CONTRASTE DEL TERRACOTA CON EL BLANCO...BUENA COMPOSICIÓN Y MUY ORIGINAL COMO SIEMPRE...SALUDOS

Carraol said...

Kate, Abe, Baruch, thank you very much for stopping by.
Gloria, Tony y Natalia, Muchas gracias por sus comentarios y visitas. Saludos.

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