The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Leonora Carrington III


"Entonces vimos a la hija del Minotauro" / "And Then, We Saw The Daughter of The Minotaur" Oleo / Oil 1953 from her exhibition on Paseo de la Reforma Ave. (Main Street)
In Greek mythology, the Minotaur (Greek: Μῑνώταυρος, Mīnṓtauros) was a creature that was part man and part bull. It dwelt at the center of the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction built for King Minos of Crete and designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus who were ordered to build it to hold the Minotaur. The historical site of Knossos is usually identified as the site of the labyrinth. The Minotaur was eventually killed by Theseus.
"Minotaur" is Greek for "Bull of Minos." The bull was known in Crete as Asterion, a name shared with Minos's foster father.

Gracias por su visita / Thanks for visiting.


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2 comments:

Château-Gontierdailyphoto said...

Thank you for showing this artist.

Carraol said...

Laurent, thanks to you for visiting.