The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Monday, September 26, 2011

The Cloisters I




Head. Strasbourg. 1280-1300

The Angel of Annunciation. Northeastern Italy 1430-40.

The Cloisters museum and gardens, the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe, was assembled from architectural elements, both domestic and religious, that date from the twelfth through the fifteenth century.
The building and its cloistered gardens—located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan—are treasures in themselves, effectively part of the collection housed there. The Cloisters' collection comprises approximately three thousand works of art from medieval Europe, dating from about the ninth to the sixteenth century.
music+image

Thanks for visiting, please be sure that I read each and every one of your kind comments, I appreciate them all. Stay tuned.

7 comments :

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Beautiful images all Carraol, the light in the B&W's is perfect!

Sensaciones en Imagenes said...

Buenos detalles de unos sitios que normalmente suelen estar repletos de historias con muchos sitios para fotografiar.
Un abrazo.

brattcat said...

though i've always wanted to stop here i've never pulled it off. at least not yet. these images increase my longing to get there someday.

Luis Gomez said...

Que buen grupo de imagenes Carraol!

Kate said...

The varied images give a wonderful peek into the Cloisters and what's available to see. I like the introductory photo because of the bright sunshine.

joo said...

Smashing! The second photo is simply gorgeous - what a light!

Antonio Machado said...

Dear Carraol,
photos in black and white as always, are extraordinary!
This preference for monochrome is common to the appreciation of the great photographers and light texture. You are an extraordinary photographer and could not escape this rule!
A big hug

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