The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~John Greer

You don't take a photograph, you make it. ~Ansel Adams

The Earth Has Music For Those Who Listen.

May 31, 2012

New York Light II


Malcolm X Blvd & Central Park North


Museum of The City of New York


  Often while traveling with a camera we arrive just as the sun slips over the horizon of a moment, 
too late to expose film, only time enough to expose our hearts.
~Minor White

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May 30, 2012

New York Light I






Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm,
but to add color to my sunset sky.
~Rabindranath Tagore


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May 29, 2012

Styles


Old Style House

World Trade Center (México City)

Create your own visual style... let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others.
~Orson Welles 

Style is knowing who you are, what you want to say, and not giving a damn.
~Gore Vidal 

Style is a simple way of saying complicated things
~Jean Cocteau

“I discovered that what's really important for a creator isn't what we vaguely define as inspiration or even what it is we want to say, recall, regret, or rebel against. No, what's important is the way we say it. Art is all about craftsmanship. Others can interpret craftsmanship as style if they wish. Style is what unites memory or recollection, ideology, sentiment, nostalgia, presentiment, to the way we express all that. It's not what we say but how we say it that matters.”
~Federico Fellini


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May 28, 2012

Tones for Joan






7 Reasons to Shoot RAW by Luis Argerich
1. To store the most from each photo.
This is my #1 reason why photographers should shoot RAW even if they don’t know how to process a RAW file. A RAW contains all the information the camera sensor recorded from the scene; if in the future we learn how to edit our photos better or new applications are created to edit photos, the only way to be able to use these new tools and knowledge in our photos is to keep the RAWs. Even if you don’t do anything with them just store them, disk space is cheap and if you ever need them, then you have them. Imagine a new tool that can do something great to photos but needs a RAW file as the input…
2. To be able to fix White Balance
The camera Auto-WB setting is good but it is never perfect and for some scenes it can go badly wrong. In a previous article I discussed some tools to improve the white balance of your photos. It’s very hard to get a perfect WB in the camera but it’s easy to do it in post-processing. And you can try several different color temperatures and find something you didn’t consider in the shoot. To correct the WB without destroying information you need to shoot RAW.
3. To extend the Dynamic Range
There are several tools and utilities to create HDR images from a single RAW. The explanation is very simple: A RAW contains all the exposure information the camera sensor could capture and that’s more than what a single JPG can represent. So a good piece of software can use that exposure information in the RAW to create a photo with more dynamic range compared to the default JPG that the camera creates.
4. To improve our processing options
There’re several good tools to develop RAW files. Many of those applications can fix distortion, correct chromatic aberration, correct lens softness and do many, many interesting things. They are not a complete solution for a photo-editing workflow but they are a great first step before editing with Photoshop or something else. DxO optics for example can create an image from a RAW file that is far better than a default in-camera JPG.
5. To reduce noise
There are two big advantages about shooting RAW in terms of noise. The first advantage is that you can expose to the right maximizing the signal that the camera gets and thus improving the signal to noise ratio. If you expose to the right you need to shoot RAW to be able to fix the exposure of the shot to something you like. The second advantage is that the RAW processor can apply a first instance of noise-reduction to the RAW file with results that are not as destructive as a noise reduction applied to a JPG. If you shoot frequently in twilight or at night RAW is mandatory to improve your shots.
6. To improve prints
This is as simple as “real pixels are better than software created pixels” when you shoot a photo as you will probably need to do many things before printing. Leveling the shot a little, cropping, changing colors to match the printer profile and of course sharpening. If you do all these things over a JPG you will be editing and modifying a file that is not intended for editing. JPGs are the final step in any workflow, so if you start with a JPG you can’t do anything and we all know that no photo is perfect for printing straight from the camera.
7. Why not?
I left another strong but simple reason for the end. Unless you really need to shoot JPG because you need a certain burst speed or you have a small memory card, there’s really no reason against shooting RAW. You can even shoot RAW + JPG if you want and use the JPG storing the RAW for the future. Shooting JPG is like using a polaroid camera, you lose your negatives and what you get is the final representation of your photo, it has little flexibility.

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May 27, 2012

Glanced up and down the street


Glance
Inner Circuit
Aperture ISO Speed 

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May 26, 2012

Into Oblivion




Zen and the Art of Photography

Wayne Rowe California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

Driven by a passion for photography and a fascination with the Zen Buddhist philosophy,
the author conceptually and experientially examines the relationship between Zen Buddhism 
and the art of photography.
Among the subjects discussed:
What is the relationship between haiku and photography?
What is the relationship between the mind of the photographer while creating a photograph and the Zen concept of the Empty Mind?
What role does intuition and feeling play in photography?
In Zen?
Through examination of these concepts and relationships,
the author explains the heightened awareness, joy, and enlightenment he has experienced
through photography and suggests ways that others may share in the creative process.


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May 25, 2012

Sunday





THE CURRENT CHALLENGE
Fri May 25, 2012
This week's challenge:
'Of House & Home'.

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May 24, 2012

Cubes






We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.
Carl Sagan


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May 23, 2012

Tlayuda



Tlayuda is a handmade dish part of traditional Mexican cuisine, consisting of a large and thin crunchy partially fried or toasted tortilla, covered with a spread of refried beans, asiento (unrefined pork lard), lettuce or cabbage, avocado, meat (usually shredded chicken, beef tenderloin or pork), Oaxaca cheese, and salsa.

They are a popular antojito (snack food) originating from the state of Oaxaca, and can be found particularly around Oaxaca City. Tlayudas are also available in the center-south region of Mexico, such as Mexico City, Puebla or Guadalajara, but by tradition, the tlayuda is considered a representative iconic dish of Oaxaca.

The dinner-plate-sized tortilla is baked, not fried, either on a comal, a barbecue grill, or directly over coals. Once the tortilla has been cooked, refried beans are applied on its surface, along with lard and vegetables, to serve as a base on top of which the main ingredients will be placed. The rules for topping a tlayuda are not strict, and restaurants and street vendors often offer a variety of different toppings, including tasajo (cuts of meat typical of Central Valley of Oaxaca), chorizo, and cecina enchilada (thin strips of chili powder encrusted pork). They may be prepared open-faced or folded in half.
The Tlayuda topped with roasted grasshoppers was featured on episode 8 of the documentary-styled travel and cuisine program Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern on the Travel Channel. The dish also appeared on Globe Trekker with Neil Gibson as host. Both presenters compared the Tlayuda with a large pizza. [Wiki]

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