The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Teotihuacan I









Teotihuacan was a pre-Columbian Mesoamerican city located in the Basin of Mexico, 30 miles (48 km) northeast of modern-day Mexico City, which is today known as the site of many of the most architecturally significant Mesoamerican pyramids built in the pre-Columbian Americas. Apart from the pyramids, Teotihuacan is also anthropologically significant for its complex, multi-family residential compounds, the Avenue of the Dead, and the small portion of its vibrant murals that have been exceptionally well-preserved. Additionally, Teotihuacan produced a thin orange pottery style that spread through Mesoamerica.
The city is thought to have been established around 100 BC and continued to be built until about AD 250. The city may have lasted until sometime between the 7th and 8th centuries AD. At its zenith, perhaps in the first half of the 1st millennium AD, Teotihuacan was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas, with a population of perhaps 125,000 or more, placing it among the largest cities of the world in this period. Teotihuacan began as a new religious center in the Mexican Highland around the first century AD. This city came to be the largest and most populated center in the New World. Teotihuacan was even home to multi-floor apartment compounds built to accommodate this large populatiaon. The civilization and cultural complex associated with the site is also referred to as Teotihuacan or Teotihuacano.  [Wiki]

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4 comments :

Stewart M said...

Remarkable buildings - I wonder if modern ones will last as well?

Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

ladyfi said...

What an amazing place and fabulous shots!

MARTY said...

interessant reportage and words about a great old city !
ciao Carraol

Kalantikan said...

WoW, wonderful photo essay. The strength of those steps are so amazing, can withstand erosion and elements. It is one place aside from Machu Pichu that i dreamed to visit, but might just remain as a dream. Now i remember the name Quetzalquatl, their god during those times.

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